Labneh…(?) – Adventures in Cheese-Making Part Three!

Right.
So… about a month ago, I tried to make yoghurt in my slow cooker. Again.
And I over-cooked it. Again.
So I strained out the clumps of coagulated, over-cooked yoghurt and chucked them in an empty tupperware, and and stuffed the tupperware into my fridge and ignored it for the better part of said month.
 
Two days ago, I pulled it out of the fridge, dumped it into my mash bag (a bit like a Jelly Bag but for beer- and wine-making), ran it under the cold tap to give it a bit of a rince, and the set the bag of curds into a sceive, and the sceive over a bowl, and the whole shebang into the fridge with a weight (a tin of chick peas) on top of it to further strain off the liquid for 24 hours.
 
The end result, once I mixed in some salt, is a super-soft (no rennet) cheese that is – probably(?) – a bit like labneh (yoghurt cheese) and not toooooo far away from chevre or cream cheese. I think I will put it in a quiche or, potentially, into a warm beets-and-dandelions salad with some walnuts thrown on top. šŸ™‚
 
…Okay, so, yes, I made this cheese (or possibly “cheese”) by accident. But I think I did actually make a cheese. So I’m counting this a win.
That said, I’d still like to try making mozzerella – probably the one in Animal Vegetable Miracle, as it uses store-bought (aka: pasteurized) milk as its base – at home, and I suspect that’ll be my next step in my home cheese-making adventures (Rennet! Eek!), but for now I’m happy to work with this accidental Labnehsque that I’ve cooked up.
 
 
TTFN,
Meliad the Birch Maiden.

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5 responses to “Labneh…(?) – Adventures in Cheese-Making Part Three!

  1. I happened to be looking at Deb’s Rhode Island adventure, and I saw that you’d commented, and that you’d made cheese recently. I made the mozzarella recently (with rennet! eek!) and I found it to be easy to get wrong, but wonderful to get right. I’ve not read your reasons for not wishing to work with rennet…. buuuut I just happened to look at the wikipedia entry on it, and now I’m somewhat squicked. Anyway, yes… I got my cheese-making kit (Ricki the cheese queen’s ā€” http://www.cheesemaking.com/30-Minute-Mozzarella-Ricotta-Kit.html ) from Melody at http://valleyhaberdashery.com, and it took me much longer than 30 minutes… but it was a delicious failure the first time out. Second time will be, I suspect, faster and easier.

    • Hi, Andrew,
      I’m an “omnomnomnivore”, so working with rennet – or avoiding it – has nothing to do with where the rennet comes from. I figure, if I’ll eat a lamb’s leg, I can eat the lining of his stomach, too, and not see it wasted. (That said, heaven only knows whether there are “rennet calves” and “veal calves” rather than being the same animal, industrial farming being what it is…)
      That said: Thanks for the heads-up that mozzarella takes a lot longer than half an hour (at least the first time). That doesn’t surprise me too much. šŸ˜‰ I suspect Barbara and her clan had been making mozzarella once a week for going on a year, if not longer, by the time that chapter got finished, so they’d have had the hang of it by then. šŸ™‚
      I’m glad your first-time-out “failure” was delicious – though to my mind, if it’s food and it’s delicious, then it’s not actually a failure. What did you wind up with, if not mozzarella? šŸ™‚

      TTFN,
      Meliad.

      • I wouldn’t say that I did not have mozzarella. On the other hand, I think that the mozzarella that I created was not completely cooked, or fermented, or cured. Since last Thursday, I have had somewhat unusual food responses. I am covering over a wealth of not necessarily pleasant information, but in essence
        Dietary tract has been acting up when confronted with milk or existing cheese or just plain old cream in my coffee. Some of it is a reaction to the amount of pollen in the air around here, but some of it may be leftover rennet enzymes wrecking havoc in my stomach. A few days without dairy have improved things dramatically. I’ll have to test in a few weeks, to see if the negative responses to milk in my diet continue when pollen is not such an issue.

      • Ah, gotcha. Thanks for the heads-up about the potential for GI Weirdness. Here’s hoping things improve! šŸ™‚

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